Jewelry Guide

585 Gold – Everything you Need to Know

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There’s a lot of confusion when it comes to types of gold. One type that we often hear about is 585 gold. But what exactly is 585 gold and is it worth purchasing? In this article, we’ll take a closer look at 585 gold, its purity, price, and jewelry styles.

The short answer? 585 gold is 14K gold, containing 58.3% or 58.5% of pure gold in its composition. For the longer answer, keep reading!

What is 585 Gold?

Before we look at what 585 gold is, it’s important to understand that most gold on the market is alloyed. Because pure gold is too soft and difficult to mold, it’s typically mixed with certain other metals to get a strong and sturdy form.

One such alloy is 14K gold, which is also sometimes known as 585 gold. 14 karat gold is made by mixing 58.3% gold with other metals such as nickel, copper or zinc, to enhance the metal’s durability and workability.

You might be wondering why 14K gold is known as 585 gold when it only contains 58.3% gold. The reason for this is that some manufactures produce their 14K gold slightly purer and prefer to call it 585.

583 Gold and 585 Gold are basically the same.

Although 585 gold is affordable, there’s little difference in appearance with gold alloys with higher purity. A 14K gold metal is not only beautiful but more durable for daily wear.

Is 585 Gold Real?

Yes, 585 gold is very much real. As the gold/metal ratio in 14K gold is relatively low when compared to 18K gold or 24K gold, some people believe that it is not real gold but this isn’t true.

Pure gold contains 24 karats, and is, therefore, 100% gold. 585 gold contains just over half its weight in gold. This variety of gold offers one of the best balances between durability, appearance, price and investment value.

Hallmarks on 585 Gold

You can find out the purity of your gold by looking for the ‘hallmark’ or ‘stamp’ that states how much gold is in the mix. The process of certifying the purity of gold is known as ‘hallmarking’. 585 gold or 14K gold is further categorized to sub-categories depending upon how the gold has been used in the jewelry item. Here are the common 585 gold stamps:

  • 14K: 14K stamp indicates that the gold jewelry is made from either 583 gold or 585 gold. Some manufactures might specify ‘583’ or ‘585’ in their stamp, while some may just stamp it as 14K. But the price of gold jewelry stamped with 585 or 583 is the same. The price, value, and purity are almost identical.
  • 14K GP: If you find a ‘GP’ in the stamp, then it stands for gold plated. This is for base metals that have been coated with a thin layer of 14K gold plating.
  • 14K GEP: 14K GEP or 14K GE means that the 585 gold jewelry has been electroplated with 14K gold. In this process, a thin layer of gold is applied to the base metal using an electric current.
  • 14K GF: The stamp 14K GF stands for ‘gold filled’. This indicates that the metal is covered in a thicker layer of gold, of at least 5%. This makes it a better option than gold plating, which contains a very small amount of gold.

You may not find stamps indicating the accurate gold mix on a jewelry piece from a different country, as not all countries make it necessary for manufacturers to stamp their products.

Color Options for 585 Gold

585 gold jewelry can come in white gold, yellow gold, or rose gold. Each color has a different composition. The difference in color comes from the type of metal alloys used and their percentage. The prices of all three colors of 14K gold are nearly the same.

585 White Gold:

585 white gold contains pure gold alloyed with white metals like silver, nickel, and palladium. They usually have a rhodium coating.

  • Advantages: This one is a great choice as it looks contemporary and stylish. It is more affordable than platinum but offers a similar shade. It is more durable and scratch-resistant than yellow gold.
  • Disadvantages: To maintain the beauty of a 585 white gold jewelry piece, you will have to polish it every few years and replace its rhodium plating. Another problem with white gold is it’s not hypoallergenic.

 585 Yellow Gold

This beautiful color is the most common, classic and traditional. It is made from pure gold and alloy metals like copper and zinc.

  • Advantages: It is the most hypoallergenic of all the three gold types and looks great on vintage-style jewelry. Yellow gold is easier to maintain, complements darker and olive-colored skin tones and you can use it with lower color grade diamonds as well.
  • Disadvantages: It is more prone to dents and scratches as it’s softer than white or rose gold.

585 Rose Gold

Rose gold jewelry pieces include red, rose, and pink shades of gold. Pure gold and copper combine to form a lovely rose gold color. The color darkens when more copper is present, similarly, it lightens when less copper is present.

  • Advantages: This color looks great for both men’s and women’s rings. It has a lovely pinkish hue and looks most romantic. Rose gold jewelry is highly durable due to its composition and the inclusion of copper. This version of gold looks great on any skin tone. Rose gold doesn’t need plating which makes it easier to maintain.
  • Disadvantages: Some people may get reactions to rose gold due to the inclusion of copper.

When to Buy 585 Gold?

Most people buy jewelry based on its looks, price, and longevity. Whether or not to invest in 14K gold, depends upon your budget. If you do not have a huge budget, you can consider investing in 14K gold, as it is more affordable than gold with higher purity, like 18K gold. Additionally, it is more durable for everyday wear items like engagement rings, earrings, bracelets, and pendants.

Wrapping Up

585 gold is an ideal choice when you want to invest in everyday-wear jewelry at a great price. It looks as classy as other costlier options. It is also more durable and is easier to maintain. Note that 585 is basically 14K gold and some pieces of jewelry can contain both the 585 mark and the 14K mark.

Hopefully, this article has cleared up any confusions you may have had about 585 gold. If not, feel free to contact us for more information.

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